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Audiophiles

How to Store Vinyl Records in 2022

Do you wish to safeguard your vinyl record collection? If so, you must be aware of appropriate vinyl record storage. Aside from being expensive, vinyl albums frequently hold sentimental value. Vinyl records should be kept secure and undamaged so they can be listened to for many years to come. Vinyl can’t be handled like a CD; it won’t play the data that were recorded on it without any issues when carried around the home, thrown, or given to friends. Here, a connoisseur’s attitude is required; someone who is aware of the value of the objects in his possession. It is crucial to understand that the reason these items are so uncommon is because they have long since lost their utility. As a result, I’m hoping that this information will enable you to understand a lot more about effective record storing.

Finding a record that has been long sought after might be like winning the lottery for certain collectors. And what if that record also happens to be quite valuable? That can certainly improve the situation. However, if your collection is substantial, you will require a special location for these priceless items. Vinyl may be picky about storage, unlike modern audio formats, so you don’t have to worry about keeping your digital music collection. We will discuss how to properly clean and store your documents in order to maintain them in the best condition.

Clean the Vinyl Records Before Storing

You must first comprehend something that should be evident. Remember that the best record cleaners are required because you still treat rare and expensive goods like vinyl records. You must take a unique approach to them; under no circumstances should you clean your record with sponges, rags, T-shirts, or anything else. Even if the fabric is soft, you still run the risk of leaving unsightly scratches and scuffs.

There are certain cleaning products. So, if you keep vinyl records at home, you should absolutely invest in a cleaning brush. If you simply touch it softly and rotate the record 360 degrees, it won’t produce any unwelcome dust. This is accessible at any record store or in specialty vinyl shops. Additionally generally on all specialized websites.

You shouldn’t use “home” cleaning techniques if your collection contains any records that need more thorough cleaning. The best course of action would be to buy a specialized vinyl-cleaning solution, drip it onto a napkin, and wipe the debris away in circular motions. To keep the records in good condition, this cleaning procedure should be carried out every six months.

Records need to be kept as spotless as possible when being stored, just like any other item. Everyone will be familiar with the sound of a scratch or static on a record, regardless of whether they have ever listened to a vinyl record. It is the standard sound bed for any reproduction of an old recording. Turntables will frequently stimulate the static charge as they turn and the stylus drags on the record’s surface because vinyl records are like a magnet for dust. Dust buildup on the vinyl surface results in undesired background static noise and lowers the audio quality.

Make sure the turntable cover is closed while the record is being played to stop more dust from being drawn to the record’s surface. When you’re through playing, use an antistatic brush or wipe to remove static electricity before putting the CD back into the inner sleeve. A high pressure electric duster, like the CompuCleaner Xpert, that can effectively remove even persistent dust without coming into touch with the record surface and without creating static electricity would be new technology for this job. When doing this, go away from the player and use the bristles, a wipe, or airflow to follow the grooves.

Where to store Vinyl Records?

Temperature

The temperature of the location should be taken into account as the first and most crucial factor. Vinyl records should be kept in a cool environment that is neither too hot nor too cold. Long-term exposure to intense heat can cause the vinyl to distort and have other negative effects. It can be a terrific option if you have a temperature-controlled attic or storage space. Most attics, however, will get much hotter than the rest of the house. Cellars are a fantastic option, but you must pay particular attention to the humidity in that space.

Humidity

The humidity level is the second most crucial factor to take into account when deciding how to store your vinyl records. Over time, excessive atmospheric moisture or humidity might harm your albums significantly. The Northeast Document Conservation Center advises keeping vinyl records at a temperature of 50 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit and a relative humidity of 30 to 40%.

As it won’t become as humid as a cellar may, a finished basement in a typical home is typically ideal for this. Try to locate a space in your home that will stay cool and normally has low humidity if that isn’t a possibility.

Light

The humidity level is the second most crucial factor to take into account when deciding how to store your vinyl records. Over time, excessive atmospheric moisture or humidity might harm your albums significantly. The Northeast Document Conservation Center advises keeping vinyl records at a temperature of 50 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit and a relative humidity of 30 to 40%.

As it won’t become as humid as a cellar may, a finished basement in a typical home is typically ideal for this. Try to locate a space in your home that will stay cool and normally has low humidity if that isn’t a possibility.

How to Store Vinyl Records

Short-term vinyl record storage

You should choose a temporary storage option for records that you listen to frequently. These can be kept on a shelf underneath your turntable and retrieved as needed. Even though the temperature for them can get up to or even near 70 degrees, you still need to watch the humidity level. You won’t need to be as careful with how you store them if you use them frequently. That is, as long as you are adequately cleaning them before to and following each play and as long as you do not have a significant number of records exposed on your shelf.

To help you preserve and protect your records, The Sound of Vinyl sells inner and outer sleeves. Between the cardboard cover and the vinyl are inside sleeves. They assist in preventing dust from gathering on your vinyl and are constructed of anti-static paper or plastic. The plastic sleeves are significantly preferable to the paper sleeves that records generally come in. In fact, over time, utilizing paper covers can harm your recordings. If you can, stay away from them and choose plastic instead.

The vinyl inside the album cover and the cardboard album cover are both protected by outer sleeves, which are normally made of plastic. Both inner and outer sleeves are useful for preserving your LPs, while an inner sleeve is more likely to be present if you buy vintage records.

Long-term vinyl record storage

Unfortunately, the majority of individuals are unaware of the right methods for long-term storage of vinyl collections. You should look for a more permanent location to keep them if they won’t be used for a year or more. When putting your documents into storage, especially if you have a lot of them, there are a few things to keep in mind.

The biggest error individuals make while keeping vinyl records is failing to take into account the pressure that is applied to them. Usually, a 12-inch LP weighs more than 5 ounces. The final LP in line would be under 15-20 pounds of pressure if there were 50 of these on the shelf. That won’t be a problem for a moment or two. Make sure none of the records are under excessive pressure before storing them for an extended period of time. This could lead to a variety of issues, including warping and groove distortion.

You should try to refrain from emptying your entire record collection into a trash can due to the pressure issue. They will keep falling and pushing against themselves as time passes, possibly doing long-term harm.

Instead, choose a shelf arrangement that will allow you to keep different record-related portions distinct. There shouldn’t be more than 15 recordings leaning against each other on a shelf because any more will put undue pressure on the records. Instead of using a metal shelf, you may choose a wooden one to reduce static. Your records will be more shielded from dust accumulation and static energy as a result.

Make sure you have some firm, solid dividers if you don’t have a lot of shelves to divide up your records. These are simple to locate online. All you need to support your records is some thick wood placed in between them.

Instead than tilting to one side on the shelf, LPs should ideally stand upright. By doing this, the strain on the final records will be lessened. By adding a divider every 4-6 inches, you can do this. Additionally, you can utilize these to assist with collection organization. Label each divider with the genre it belongs to, or use it to arrange your records alphabetically. This is a fantastic choice because it addresses two problems at once.

Vinyl Me Please provides a nice DIY tutorial for making your own record dividers if you want to give it a try. Although it might not be for everyone, doing this can help you save money and is also a lot of fun. One other thing regarding long-term storage: make sure to give them a thorough cleaning before putting them in storage. How to thoroughly clean worn-out, outdated records is covered in-depth in The Sound of Vinyl’s record cleaning guide.

If the records are brand-new, make sure to clean the grooves of any dust or dirt with an anti-static brush. The next time you play it, the stylus will embed the dust into the LP because if it sits for a long time, it may get too deeply embedded in the record to be removed. This is what causes the LP to play back with a lot of crackling and skipping. If the record isn’t in great condition, you should give it a deeper clean. For comprehensive directions on this, see our page.